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What issues drove Americans to vote? We hear from some voters

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

If you're just waking up, we do not have final election results for you at this time. The House of Representatives is still up for grabs, although just a few seats changing would give Republicans control, and they are considered to be favored to do that. The United States Senate is still up in the air. A change of just one seat toward Republicans would give Republicans the chamber. But at the moment, Democrats are up one, having picked up a seat in Pennsylvania. Several races are undecided. That could still go either way.

Now, among those casting ballots yesterday and over the last several weeks were new citizens and first-time voters. Maria Casasola (ph) cast her ballot in Massachusetts.

MARIA CASASOLA: It felt great to just be able to vote and be in a place where I can freely make a decision and have it count.

INSKEEP: Wisconsin voter Francis Ellingsworth (ph) said he's looking for change.

FRANCIS ELLINGSWORTH: Hopefully get the inflation down, get the gas prices down, get the crime figured out, close our borders - those are the things that need to happen. I'm going full-blown Republican just 'cause I don't want the Democrats in there anymore.

INSKEEP: Back in Massachusetts, Alison Kotin wants some things to stay the same.

ALISON KOTIN: I always assumed that once gay marriage was legal, we've never have to worry about that again - (crying) sorry - you know, knowing that something that used to be a law that we felt like we could really depend on. You know, that could go away. And that's really scary.

INSKEEP: Ashley Christopher (ph) in Wisconsin and Jan Adler (ph) in Nevada had an eye for consistency.

ASHLEY CHRISTOPHER: I'm just all-girl team, you know, girl power. So I'm going for Mandela Barnes to see...

JAN ADLER: I voted straight Republicans. I'm sorry, but that's how I feel. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.