Alana Wise

Alana Wise joined WAMU in September 2018 as the 2018-2020 Audion Reporting Fellow for Guns & America. Selected as one of 10 recipients nationwide of the Audion Reporting Fellowship, Alana works in the WAMU newsroom as part of a national reporting project and is spending two years focusing on the impact of guns in the Washington region.

Prior to joining WAMU, Wise was a politics and later companies news reporter at Reuters, where she covered the 2016 presidential election and the U.S. airline industry. Ever the fan of cherry blossoms and unpredictable weather, Alana, an Atlanta native and Howard University graduate, can be found roaming the city admiring puppies and the national monuments, in that order.

 

The science is clear: Vaccines are a safe and effective way to prevent serious illness, hospitalization and death from the coronavirus, and vaccine mandates are an effective tool in promoting widespread vaccinations.

The House of Representatives on Tuesday voted 219-206 to approve a short-term increase in the federal debt ceiling, heading off fiscal calamity and putting an end — for now — to tense negotiations between the two major parties.

The House vote comes after the Senate last week passed the measure, which will keep the nation from defaulting on its debt obligations.

Former President Donald Trump continued to champion the lie that he was unfairly stripped of office in the White House race against President Biden, saying Wednesday that the "real insurrection" happened on Election Day 2020.

The meme response was swift and brutal.

The question — "Will you commit to ending finsta?" — asked in earnest by 75-year-old Sen. Richard Blumenthal, was meant to press Facebook about what it could do to better address child exploitation and mental health on its platforms.

The problem, however, as Antigone Davis, the social media behemoth's global head of safety, gingerly replied, is that Facebook does not "do" finsta at all.

Updated September 27, 2021 at 7:21 PM ET

The federal government is on the brink of a partial shutdown after Senate Republicans blocked debate on legislation that would have simultaneously funded the government and suspended the nation's borrowing limit.

The bill, which needed 60 votes to proceed, failed 48-50, as Republicans followed through on a threat to block the spending measure over objections to an unrelated spending package currently being negotiated by Democrats.

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