Arezou Rezvani

ISLAMABAD — The nightmares come easy and often for Afghan journalist Taqi Daryabi.

When they do, the 22-year-old reporter for the Afghan newspaper Etilaatroz is instantly transported back to a dank room in a Taliban-run police station, where a group of former fighters brutally beat him and his colleague Nematullah Naqdi last month for covering a women's protest in Kabul.

TORKHAM, Pakistan — Although the Kabul airport has opened again to international flights, many Afghans are still trying to flee overland, through major border crossings like the one in Torkham, Pakistan.

Updated October 15, 2021 at 4:00 PM ET

Editor's note: This story was first published on Feb. 9, 2021. It is regularly updated, and includes explicit language.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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