Brian Naylor

NPR News' Brian Naylor is a correspondent on the Washington Desk. In this role, he covers politics and federal agencies.

With more than 30 years of experience at NPR, Naylor has served as National Desk correspondent, White House correspondent, congressional correspondent, foreign correspondent, and newscaster during All Things Considered. He has filled in as host on many NPR programs, including Morning Edition, Weekend Edition, and Talk of the Nation.

During his NPR career, Naylor has covered many major world events, including political conventions, the Olympics, the White House, Congress, and the mid-Atlantic region. Naylor reported from Tokyo in the aftermath of the 2011 earthquake and tsunami, from New Orleans following the BP oil spill, and from West Virginia after the deadly explosion at the Upper Big Branch coal mine.

While covering the U.S. Congress in the mid-1990s, Naylor's reporting contributed to NPR's 1996 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Journalism Award for political reporting.

Before coming to NPR in 1982, Naylor worked at NPR Member Station WOSU in Columbus, Ohio, and at a commercial radio station in Maine.

He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Maine.

The select committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol is holding its first meeting Tuesday. Scheduled to testify are four police officers, two from the U.S. Capitol Police and two from the Washington, D.C., Metropolitan Police Department.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., has vetoed two Republican nominees to the panel set to investigate the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol.

Citing "statements and actions" made by the pair — Reps. Jim Banks of Indiana and Jim Jordan of Ohio — Pelosi said she was rejecting their nominations "with respect for the integrity of the investigation."

"The unprecedented nature of January 6th demands this unprecedented decision," Pelosi said.

Updated July 21, 2021 at 4:31 PM ET

High tech has become ubiquitous in our lives. Everything from tractors to toasters to what we used to call telephones are now built with microchips. But when these devices and machines are broken, your choices to repair them are pretty limited.

Updated July 13, 2021 at 6:01 PM ET

Amid Republican efforts to enact new state-level election rules, President Biden on Tuesday gave a stark warning about the future of voting rights.

"This is a test of our time," Biden said in a long-promised speech from Philadelphia.

Updated July 1, 2021 at 6:22 PM ET

Former President Donald Trump's family business and its longtime chief financial officer, Allen Weisselberg, have been charged by the Manhattan district attorney's office in a case involving an array of alleged tax-related crimes.

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